Local History Speaker Series talk in Collaboration with the Leisler Institute

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The Jacob Leisler Institute, in cooperation with the library, will present Libelers, Monsters, and Rebels: The Jacob Leisler Institute and Research into New York’s Neglected English Colonial Period on Thursday, February 22 at 6pm at the library. During this local history talk David Voorhees will discuss the Zenger Trial, the Claverack Giant and local Native tribes, the so-called Negro Conspiracy of 1741, and, of course, Jacob Leisler and the 1689-1691 Leisler’s Rebellion. The focus of this event will be on the integration of various European ethnic groups into a broader English colonial melting pot (Huguenots, Germans, Dutch, English, etc), and on the English manorial and political systems which continue to impact this region today.

A question and answer period and refreshments will follow the talk. For more information email programs@hudsonarealibrary.org, call 518.828.1792 x101, or visit the main desk in the library.

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Creative Writing for Seniors

Due to popular demand, we are offering another series of Creative Writing For Seniors, on Thursdays from March 1, 8, 15, and 22, from 2:30 – 4pm.  

This class will be taught by author, artist, educator, and social activist Maureen McNeil. Maureen has created writing programs for NYC public school students, US prisoners, seniors, veterans, and families of 9/11 victims. She believes that everyone’s story is needed to help solve the problems of the world. Maureen is also author of the recently published Dear Red: The Lost Diary of Marilyn Monroe and Red Hook Stories.

The class will focus on discovering the power of the inner self through the practice of daily writing. Students will explore memories, sensory observation, dreams, autobiography, fiction, and poetry. Each week, Maureen will share the work of one inspiring writer who broke through social barriers and connected with the community. Seniors will be asked to share a selection of their work. All levels of writers are welcome. Copies of the zine published with students’ work from the fall classes are available at the library and on the library’s website. A final celebration of student writing will be held in the library.  

The class is free and open to the public and is wheelchair accessible. Registration is limited, and is on a first come/first serve basis. To register, please visit the front desk at the Hudson Area Library, call 518.828.1792 x101, or email programs@hudsonarealibrary.org.

 

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Tween Advisory Council Saturday Matinee

Hudson Area Library’s Tween Advisory Council, is a new committee made up of youth (ages 8-12) who take on a leadership role in creating and hosting library events and workshops for their peers.

The council is pleased to announce their first event: A free screening of 2017’s Spider-Man: Homecoming on Saturday, March 3, 2018 at 4:30pm in the library’s community room. The council will also be providing free popcorn, treats and door prizes! This event is open to tween and teens in the community.

For more information: please email youth@hudsonarealibrary.org or call 518-828-1792

 

 

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Silence Will Not Protect You!: An Audre Lorde Reading + Discussion Series

We are pleased to present Silence Will Not Protect You: An Audre Lorde Reading & Discussion Series, a 6 part-series focused on the work of Poet, Civil Rights Activist and Librarian Audre Lorde. The 6 sessions will be held on Mondays, March 19, 26, April 9, 16, 23 & 30, 6-7:30pm.

This program will be facilitated by Donna Ford-Grover, who teaches in Literature and American Studies at Bard College.

This series is made possible in part with funds and support from Humanities New York and is part of their thematic Reading and Discussion series. Continue reading

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Nonfiction Book Group to Discuss The New Jim Crow in March

After a very successful first meeting, our new nonfiction book group decided to discuss The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness by Michelle Alexander at their next meeting, March 1, 6-8pm. The New Jim Crow is a thorough and shocking account of how, after the gains of the Civil Rights Movement, the US prison system has functioned as a replacement of Jim Crow and other discriminatory laws and practices that denied African Americans their civil rights. The book is available to borrow in print, ebook, and on CD through the library. To reserve a copy, visit the online catalog, call or stop by the main desk at the library.

Book club selections are chosen based on participants’ suggestions. To register for the book group, email morton@hudsonarealibrary.org, call 518.828.1792 x101, or visit the main desk in the library.

This nonfiction book group is focused on history and social and political life in North America. The group will utilize the best in nonfiction books chosen by participants to explore issues that are topical today. All are welcome to join with the hope that participants will impact each other through discussion and community. Mark Orton, a member of the library board, will be the moderator for discussions.

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Winter Hack : Video Production Lab for Tweens and Teens

Untitled by Natasha Wedd, Hack The Library Summer Session, 2017

As part of our expanded programming in 2018, we are pleased to present Winter Hack, a session of the successful tween program: Hack The Library, during school winter recess, February 22 & 23, 10am-3pm. 

Tweens and Teens can join Filmmaker and Music Video director Zia Anger for a two day media camp at the library. They will learn how to shoot, edit and move on camera. Finished works will appear on the library’s YouTube channel and in house monitor. Continue reading

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Dungeons & Dragons

We are pleased to present a  specialized campaign of Dungeons and Dragons for Tweens and Teens on Saturday, February 24, 11-2pm . No experience necessary!

Dungeons and Dragons, or D&D, is a fantasy tabletop role-playing game. Participants will get the opportunity to enter a land of magic, monsters and mortals in a campaign created by Chris Strom specifically for tweens and teens.

This program is free and open to the tweens and teens, who must register in advance. Space is limited and registration is on a first come/first serve basis. For more information email youth@hudsonarealibrary.org, call 518.828.1792 x101, or visit the main desk in the library.

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New Sunday Storytelling Program for Children & Families Begins February 11

Pamela Badila of Diata Diata

As part of our expansion for 2018, we are proud to offer “Folktales & Stories for Children & Families” with Pamela Badila, Sundays, 1-2pm beginning February 11.

During our new Sunday hours, Mrs. Badila will present folktales from around the world to children and their families. This special story hour will give families the opportunity to explore stories, told through generations, that formed the traditions and ethics of particular cultures.

Pamela is best known as the matriarch of the Badila clan and co-founder, with her late husband Elombe, of the Diata Diata International Folkloric Theatre. This community theatre company is known for their percussion ensemble, featured annually at the Hudson Winter Walk event and many others in the Northeast. Pamela writes and produces for Diata Diata, and for many years has brought people together through the power of stories. She looks forward to this new adventure!

This program is free and open to the public and take place in the library’s Community Room and children’s area. The library is wheelchair accessible and strollers are welcome.

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Frederick Douglass Was Born (02/14/1818): A Family Program

We will be celebrating the 200th anniversary of the chosen birthday of Frederick Douglass (born an enslaved person he did not know the actual date of his birth) with a cultural and literary presentation for ages 7 – 12 and their families on Wednesday, February 14, 3:30-4:30pm. Frederick Douglass Was Born! features Elena Mosley, executive director of Operation Unite NY, who will present readings and fun activities of the life of Frederick Douglass. There will also be a specially decorated cake in honor of Mr. Douglass, who taught himself to read, escaped from slavery, and spent his life speaking on behalf of abolition and women’s rights.

Elena Mosley is an educator, dancer, registered nurse, and a lover of history. As a mom, she exposed her children to their family history as well as the history of African Americans. This event is geared toward children honoring a famous quote by Mr. Douglass: “It is easier to build strong children than to repair broken men.” This day coincides with Valentine’s Day and enables participants to show their love for our American history and a man who helped make our union more perfect.

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