Understanding Hudson’s Natural Resources

Two local organizations recently provided the library with additional tools to study the natural resources and ecology of Hudson.

 

Copies of Nature In The City, a 56-page report by the Hudson Conservation Advisory Council (CAC), are now available to pick up for free at the library and City Hall. The report was completed after four years of work, including hundreds of volunteer hours, and with two state grants. It provides a broad overview of natural and urban conditions within the city and establishes a baseline of information essential to ensuring the health and well-being of Hudson’s citizens, civic spaces and natural resources.

If you want to get up close and personal with Hudson’s natural resources, use your library card to check out one of the Estuary Explorer Backpacks provided by the Columbia Land Conservancy (CLC). Then, proceed on your expedition with all the tools you need to investigate the local ecosystem according to one of the following themes: night sky, hiking, birding, insects, or water.

What’s an estuary, and why should you explore it? You may be surprised to know that the Hudson River is more than a river – it’s an arm of the sea, where salty sea water meets fresh water from streams. This means the river has two high and two low tides each day, and that the land near the river, and surrounding it, is especially rich in plant and animal life.

While the backpack kits can be used anywhere, Heidi Bock of the CLC suggests getting up close and personal with the ecosystem at Greenport Conservation Area. “There’s so much you can see and experience at Greenport,” she says. “There are small streams, wetlands, forests – and so many kinds of plants and animals that benefit from these habitats!”

This Project has been funded in part by a grant from the New York State Environmental Protection Fund through the Hudson River Estuary Program of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

Questions about Columbia Land Conservancy’s environmental education program? Contact Heidi Bock at 518-392-5252 x207 or heidi.bock@clctrust.org, or visit clctrust.org

A digital version of the Nature in the City report is also available on the City of Hudson website. The Hudson Conservation Advisory Council was established in 2015 to provide Hudson’s governmental bodies and citizens with objective information about environmental concerns. There are currently several open seats on the council; interested volunteers should contact Common Council President Tom DePietro.

Stop by the main desk at the library or call 518-828-1792 to pick up a copy of the report or to reserve an Estuary Explorer Backpack for your next adventure!

 

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