History Room Programs

Only the most recent five History Room Program announcements are shown here. Go to History Room Programs Archive for complete listings.


Posted: February 11, 2020
Adults, History Room, News, Programs

Local History Talk on Oakdale Park

Oakdale Beach, Hudson, 1965
Photo Credit: Howard Gibson

Program Description: The library and the Greenport Historical Society present: “Beyond the Farmyard: The Development of Oakdale Park”. Local historian Paul Barrett, in collaboration with John Craig, discusses how the Glenwood Boulevard neighborhood in Hudson developed and the importance of the 14-acre Oakdale Park for residents today.

Date/Time: Thursday, March 19, 6-7:30pm

Suggested Audience: This event is free and open to the public. It takes place in the community room of the library, which is wheelchair accessible.

In 1907, plans were already underway for a community of new homes in Hudson offering paved streets, sidewalks and convenient access to the Hudson business district. What’s more, the design of this new development included a 5-acre man made lake surrounded by a beautifully landscaped 5-acre public park known as Oakdale. The brainchild of local farmer, banker and businessman Arthur Farrand, “Oakdale Park” was created for the benefit and enjoyment of all Hudson citizens.

Oakdale Park is used today by the City of Hudson Youth Department as a summer day camp site, a fishing, canoeing and swimming area for many locals, a natural respite from the city, and a pedestrian path for those coming from the Fairview Avenue shopping area. As more and more understanding and support for the value of the area’s Oakdale Lake grows, through organizations such as the Friends of Oakdale Lake, interest in its creation and history have also increased.

Mr. Barrett, a researcher and local historian, is a sales agent for TKG Real Estate. This is his third talk for the library’s local history series. Assisting Mr. Barrett is Hudson Area Library History Room head researcher John Craig. John is also the long-time publisher of Rundy’s Journal.

A question and answer period and refreshments will follow the talk. For more information email programs@hudsonarealibrary.org, call 518-828-1792 x101, or visit the main desk in the library.

The Greenport Historical Society provides excellent programs of both an educational and entertaining nature. These are available to the membership and general public at no charge. Membership is open to everyone and residency in the town is not a consideration. www.greenporthistoricalny.org .

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Posted: February 1, 2020
Adults, History Room, News, Programs

Opening Reception: The History of the Census in Hudson

Program Description: The Hudson Area Library and the Jacob Leisler Institute for the Study of Early New York History invite the public to the opening reception of their exhibition The History of the Census in Hudson at the library.

Since ancient times, societies have kept counts of their population for various purposes. This exhibit examines the United States federal censuses that have been taken since 1790, the New York State censuses taken since 1825, colonial censuses that precede the American revolution, and the upcoming 2020 federal census. Focusing on Hudson from its founding and even earlier times, and includes original 1845 census books for the City of Hudson, displayed alongside maps, documents and images that illuminate the area’s growth and history. Additional information, regarding the 2020 census and its importance to Hudson and its inhabitants will also be on view.

Date/Time: Thursday, February 6 from 6pm until 7:30pm in the library’s community room. Refreshments will be served. The exhibit will be on display from February 6 until March 31.

The exhibition was developed in collaboration with the Jacob Leisler Institute for the Study of Early New York History, an independent, not-for-profit study and research center devoted to collecting, preserving, and disseminating information relating to colonial New York under English rule. In the years spanning 1664 to 1773, New York province’s diverse European settlements and Native American and African populations fused into a cosmopolitan colonial territory with ties throughout the Atlantic World. The Institute is unique in focusing on this under examined 109-year period in American history.

The History Room hours are Tuesdays 4 – 6pm and Saturdays 10am – 12pm, during which people visit and browse the extensive collection of city directories, yearbooks and local history books; and research items in the archival collection. The public can also request information on local history that volunteers will research. Appointments are available upon request. For more information email reference@hudsonarealibrary.org, call 518-828-1792 x100, or visit the main desk in the library.

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Posted: December 27, 2019
Adults, History Room, News, Programs

Local History Talk on Colonial NY Censuses

Program Description: Dr. David W. Voorhees presents the next lecture in the library’s Local History Speaker series. Explore the world of early censuses with a focus on New Netherland and colonial New York.

Date/Time: Thursday, January 9, 6:00-7:30pm.

The Hudson Area Library History Room, in collaboration with the  Leisler Institute for the Study of Early New York History, presents the latest in its Local History Speaker series: Colonial New York Censuses: the several places where the inhabitants were dwelling by David Voorhees, Thursday, January 9, 6-7:30pm. Since ancient times, societies have kept counts of their population for administrative purposes. Dr. Voorhees will present on when, how and why population surveys took place in colonial New Netherland and New York, with a specific focus on Claverack Landing, (as Hudson was known before it was named Hudson.) A question and answer period and refreshments will follow the talk. For more information, email programs@hudsonarealibrary.org, call 518-828-1792 x101, or visit the main desk in the library.

The lecture is a precursor to the History of the Census in Hudson exhibition which will open at the library on February 6. The exhibit examines the United States federal censuses that have been taken every ten years since 1790, the New York State censuses taken every ten years since 1825, colonial censuses that precede the American revolution, and the upcoming 2020 federal census. The exhibit also includes historic information and artifacts specific to the City of Hudson, and will illustrate why census information is an important tool for a city like Hudson, and its citizens.

Dr. Voorhees is director of the Jacob Leisler Papers Project, formerly located at New York University, as well as the Jacob Leisler Institute headquartered in Hudson. He’s also managing editor of de Halve Maen (The Half Moon), a quarterly scholarly journal published by The Holland Society of New York. An NYU research scientist, he is a former managing reference history editor at Charles Scribner’s Sons and has published numerous historical works and articles, and been a consultant on historical exhibits at the Museum of the City of New York and the Bard Graduate Center in Manhattan among others.

The Jacob Leisler Institute for the Study of Early New York History is an independent, not-for-profit study and research center devoted to collecting, preserving, and disseminating information relating to colonial New York under English rule. In the years spanning 1664 to 1773, New York province’s diverse European settlements and Native American and African populations fused into a cosmopolitan colonial territory with ties throughout the Atlantic World. The Institute is unique in focusing on this under examined 109-year period in American history.

The Institute contains a collection of original, digital, and/or paper copies of primary source manuscripts, books, maps, and illustrative materials, as well as a library of secondary resources that provide scholarly context to the primary sources. The Jacob Leisler Institute is an open resource for both scholars and the interested public. 

The Hudson Area Library History Room houses a special collection that pertains to the history of the City of Hudson, Greenport and Stockport; as well as Columbia County and New York State. The History Room also hosts the Local History Speaker Series at the library, offering free monthly talks on diverse topics related to the history of Hudson, Greenport, Stockport, and Columbia County.

The History Room hours are Tuesdays 4 – 6pm and Saturdays 10am – 12pm, during which people visit and browse the extensive collection of city directories, yearbooks and local history books; and research items in the archival collection. The public can also request information on local history that volunteers will research. Appointments are available upon request. For more information email reference@hudsonarealibrary.org, call 518-828-1792 x100, or visit the main desk in the library.

The Hudson Area Library is located at 51 North Fifth Street in Hudson, NY. The mission of the library is to enrich the quality of life by providing free and equal access to programs, services and resources, and by creating opportunities for all members of our community to connect, create, learn and grow.

 

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Posted: November 30, 2019
Adults, Children, History Room, News, Programs

Hudson Area Library at Winter Walk!

 

This just in: The Hudson Area Library joins the festivities of Hudson’s Winter Walk 2019 sponsored by Hudson Hall, Saturday, December 7, 5-8pm, with a space at 538 Warren Street! The library’s History Room will have a window display featuring photos by Howard Gibson of the holidays in Hudson from years past. In addition we will have other historic photographs on display and full size copies of our 1881 and 1923 bird’s eye view maps of  Hudson. Our local history researchers will be on hand to answer questions and discuss our resources. And, the History Room, will have  notecards and framed and unframed giclèe copies of the Hudson maps for sale as well as rare local history books.

Emily Chameides, Library Director, commented, “We’re excited to take part in this beloved community event and we are particularly proud to have the wonderful resources of our History Room celebrated through our participation.”

We particularly want to thank Dina Palin of Houlihan Lawrence, Inc. and the owners of 538 Warren for their generous loan of this space.

 

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Posted: November 25, 2019
Adults, History Room, Programs, Videos

Nonfiction Book Group discusses The Dust Bowl

Program Description: Join the group for a discussion of Ken Burns’ documentary film The Dust Bowl, (in 2 parts, totaling 4 hours of viewing time.) Be sure to watch the film BEFORE coming to the discussion group. You can access the two-part film for free through our new Kanopy streaming service (available to all library cardholders in Columbia County), as well as on DVD through the Mid-Hudson Library System.

Date/Time: Monday, December 9, 6 – 7:30 pm.

Registration: This book group is facilitated by library Board President Mark Orton. To register for the book group, email morton@hudsonarealibrary.org. For more information on the Nonfiction Book Group, click here.

The Dust Bowl tells the story of “the worst man-made ecological disaster in American history, in which the frenzied wheat boom of the ‘Great Plow-Up,’ followed by a decade-long drought during the 1930s nearly swept away the breadbasket of the nation.” For more information on the film, visit https://www.pbs.org/kenburns/dustbowl/.

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Only the most recent five Adult Programs are shown here. Go to Adult Programs Archive for complete listings

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