History Room Programs

Only the most recent five History Room Program announcements are shown here. Go to History Room Programs Archive for complete listings.


Posted: May 20, 2019
Adults, History Room, News, Programs

Architectural Roots of New England Houses

Photo Credit: Ian Stewart

Program Description: The library, in collaboration with the Leisler Institute for the Study of Early New York History & the Gotham Center for New York City History, presents: A Truly American Form: Anglo Dutch Houses, Their Roots, Form, and Legacy by Ian Stewart. In the former New Netherland a new house form arose in the latter years of the 18th century and became a common sight in New England in the first half of the 19th century. This talk focuses on the framing of these houses and their various forms, as well as a brief discussion of their English and Dutch predecessors, and the circumstances which may have led to the creation of this hybrid.

Date/Time: Thursday, June 13, 2019, 6-7:30pm

Ian Stewart is owner of New Netherland Timber Framing and Preservation, past president of the Board of Directors of the Preservation Trades Network, and a member of the Timber Framer’s Guild. He received a Master’s degree in Preservation Studies from Boston University’s School of American and New England Studies. His woodworking career began at SUNY New Paltz and, later, as a restoration craftsman at Historic Huguenot Street in New Paltz, New York. He is involved in preserving historic traditions in woodworking, timber framing, blacksmithing, and masonry skills. He received the New Netherland Institute’s Alice P. Kenney Award in 2018.

The Jacob Leisler Institute for the Study of Early New York History is an independent, not-for-profit study and research center devoted to collecting, preserving, and disseminating information relating to colonial New York under English rule. In the years spanning 1664 to 1773, New York province’s diverse European settlements and Native American and African populations fused into a cosmopolitan colonial territory with ties throughout the Atlantic World. The Institute is unique in focusing on this under examined 109-year period in American history.

The Institute contains a collection of original, digital, and/or paper copies of primary source manuscripts, books, maps, and illustrative materials, as well as a library of secondary resources that provide scholarly context to the primary sources. The Jacob Leisler Institute is an open resource for both scholars and the interested public.

The Hudson Area Library History Room houses a special collection that pertains to the history of the City of Hudson, Greenport and Stockport; as well as Columbia County and New York State. The History Room also hosts the Local History Speaker Series at the library, offering free monthly talks on diverse topics related to the history of Hudson, Greenport, Stockport, and Columbia County.

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Posted: April 26, 2019
Adults, History Room, News, Programs

Spring Fling Swing Dance at the Armory!

Howard Gibson photo of dance at the Armory in days gone by.

Program Description: The City of Hudson Senior Center and the library are proud to present Spring Fling Swing Dance at the Armory, a live music dance party with the Fabulous Versatones.

Date/Time: Saturday, May 18, 7-10pm.

Recommended Audience:  Attendees do not need to attend with a partner. Beginners, all ages, families are welcome.

Registration: Registration is preferred. Email programs@hudsonarealibrary.org

This dance is our fourth dance at the historic Galvan Armory, which had dances in the 40s, 50s and 60s. Sher Stevens, director of the City of Hudson Senior Center stated: “At every dance we have held…I was exhilarated to see the total engagement and joy in the dancing. Almost every age of the seniors was represented. As the hostess, I was barraged with exuberant comments and requests for MORE! ”

Andrew Resto, a professional certified Bronze level dance instructor, will be leading a short lesson and demonstration during the dance.

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Posted: April 2, 2019
Adults, Children, History Room, News, Programs, Young Adults

Library Story Time, Activities & Shop at Basilica’s Spring Farm & Flea

 

Photo courtesy of Basilica Hudson

Program Description: Story Time programs, crafts and activities, raffle prizes, and a shop will all be in the library tent at Basilica Hudson’s Spring Farm & Flea. The library’s Tween Advisory Council is selling t-shirts they designed and the History Room has items including tea towels, tshirts, postcards and notecards with historic Hudson image and giclèe prints of 1881 and 1923 Aeroview maps of Hudson. Come by Basilica Hudson’s amazing Farm & Flea and support our Tween Advisory Council and our History Room! Admission is $5 for the weekend, children 12 and under are free.

Date/Time: Saturday and Sunday, May 11 and 12, 10am-6pm, Sunday Story Times: 11-11:30am Pamela Badila & Folktales; 1-1:30pm Drag Queen Story Time

Location: Basilica Hudson, 110 South Front Street, Hudson, NY

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Posted: March 2, 2019
Adults, History Room, News, Programs

Local History Talk on Gothic Revival House on Fairview Avenue

Program Description: The library presents the latest in its History Room Local History Speaker series: “Still Standing: The Farrand House on Fairview” by Paul Barrett. This historic and architecturally unique house has been in the news lately as there are plans to tear it down. Come and hear the history of the house while it is still standing!

Date/Time: Thursday, April 11, 6-7:30pm.

Recommended Audience: All are welcome. No registration necessary.

The Farrand family farmhouse, formerly known as “The Pines,” is an intact example of Gothic Revival architecture, and sits somewhat inconspicuously on Fairview Avenue. However, it was once the high visibility nucleus of a cutting-edge 140 acre farm operation with demonstrated advancements in the growing, transport and marketing of high quality produce. The Farrands were also involved in Hudson based shipping, warehousing and banking businesses and the management of sugar plantations in San Domingo. Long before the bustle of strip mall traffic and fast food outlets, the Farrand operation was a leading grower and shipper of pears in New York State and, amongst other things, introduced Pekin Ducks to the region. Paul Barrett will weave the story of this iconic building from the 1850s to the present.

Mr. Barrett, a researcher and local historian, is a sales agent for TKG Real Estate. This is his second talk for the library’s local history series.

A question and answer period and refreshments will follow the talk. For more information email programs@hudsonarealibrary.org, call 518-828-1792 x101, or visit the main desk in the library.

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Posted: February 28, 2019
Adults, History Room, News, Programs

Local History Talk: ‘Colonial New York’ and the World of Jacob Leisler

Courtesy of the Norman B. Leventhal Map & Education Center at the Boston Public Library

Program Description: Lou Roper, Professor of History at SUNY-New Paltz, speaks on seventeenth-century colonial New York and the Hudson River Valley in the context of the larger Atlantic World. This local history talk is a collaboration of the library, Jacob Leisler Institute for the Study of Early New York History, Gotham Center for New York City History, and Greenport Historical Society.

Date/Time: Thursday, March 21, 6-7:30pm

On the subject of this talk, Professor Roper stated: “Where does the history of New York fit into the history of colonial America and where does the history of colonial America fit into the history of the wider world? I will discuss the seventeenth-century European colonization of the greater Hudson Valley and what its history suggests about the character of early Americans.” Dr. David Voorhees, director of the Leisler Institute added, “We Americans…aren’t aware that what happened here is part of larger global movements.”

Lou Roper is Professor of History at the Department of History, State University of New York at New Paltz and is Co-General Editor of The Journal of Early American History. His latest books are Advancing Empire: English Interests and Overseas Expansion, 1613-1688 and his collection of essays, The Torrid Zone: Caribbean Colonization and Cultural Interaction in the Long Seventeenth Century. His studies at this time focus on the seventeenth-century slave trades and colonization of the area bounded by the Connecticut River and Chesapeake Bay.

A question and answer period and refreshments will follow the talk. For more information email programs@hudsonarealibrary.org, call 518-828-1792 x101, or visit the main desk in the library.

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Only the most recent five Adult Programs are shown here. Go to Adult Programs Archive for complete listings

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