Final Focus on Baldwin

baldwinprAs the concluding event after a 5-part series exploring the author’s life, we are hosting an open panel discussion on James Baldwin, his influence on contemporary life and his longer range effect on America today. The event is free, and will take place on Saturday, October 29 at 6pm
Included in the evening’s schedule is the screening of James Baldwin: From Another Place, a documentary short by Sedat Pakay, a local photographer and film maker, recently deceased, who recorded a portion of Baldwin’s life while he lived in Turkey. This intimate portrait of James Baldwin depicts the person who became an activist through living his life as honestly as he could.
Panel participants include:
  • Donna Ford-Grover, Bard professor in 19th – 20th century American Literature
  • Wesley Brown – Literature professor at Bard College at Simon’s Rock
  • Lisa Arrastia – Lecturer in Writing and Critical Inquiry at SUNY Albany
  • Kaya Weidman – co-founder & co-director of Kite’s Nest, co-founder of WGXC 90.7-FM
Presented in part with public funds from the New York Council for the Humanities and in partnership with Staley B. Keith Social Justice Center and Hudson-SURJ.
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James Baldwin’s America: A Free Screening of “Go Tell It on the Mountain”

A black man and woman sit on a porch. The woman sits in a chair. The man, dressed in overalls, sits on the floor of the porch, reading a bookJoin us for a free screening of James Baldwin’s Go Tell it on the Mountain on Saturday, September 10 from 5-7pm in the library’s Community Room. This screening is being offered as a kickoff to a reading and discussion series on Baldwin in partnership with the Staley B. Keith Social Justice Center and SURJ Hudson. All are welcome to attend the screening.

Go Tell it on the Mountain was James Baldwin’s first novel. “The book”, he said, “I had to write if I was ever going to write anything else.” It tells the moving story of a 14 year-old African American boy, growing up in Harlem in the 1930’s and struggling to find himself despite his tyrannical step-father. The stellar cast includes Paul Winfield, Alfre Woodard, Olivia Cole, Ruby Dee and Giancarlo Esposito.

James Baldwin took America’s promise of democracy seriously. The novel explores the conflict between America’s promise and its racial history, and is a powerful introduction to Baldwin’s work.

This program is free and open to the public, and is made possible in part with public funds from the New York Council for the Humanities. The program is done in partnership with Staley B. Keith Social Justice Center and SURJ-Hudson. For more information call (518) 828-1792 x101, email brenda.shufelt@hudsonarealibrary.org or stop by our front desk.

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James Baldwin’s America: A Reading and Discussion Series

A black-and-white photo of James Baldwin at his desk, looking at someone or something out of frame. A typewriter and glass are just out of focus.

James Baldwin took America’s promise of democracy seriously and examined its triumphs and failures. Join us in reading his work and exploring the conflict between America’s promise and its racial history as well as its treatment of gay Americans.

We will meet every Monday from 6-8 between September 19 – October 24. We will not be meeting on October 10 in observance of Columbus Day. All reading materials will be available from the library.

You must register in order to attend all five sessions, you must register. Registration is limited and is on a first come/first serve basis. To register or for more information call (518) 828-1792 x101, email brenda.shufelt@hudsonarealibrary.org or stop by our front desk.

These sessions are done in partnership with Staley B. Keith Social Justice Center and SURJ-Hudson, and are facilitated by Donna Ford-Grover, Bard professor of American Literature. This program is free and open to the public and is made possible in part with public funds from the New York Council for the Humanities.

 

Share

James Baldwin’s America: A Reading and Discussion Series

A black-and-white photo of James Baldwin at his desk, looking at someone or something out of frame. A typewriter and glass are just out of focus.

James Baldwin took America’s promise of democracy seriously and examined its triumphs and failures. Join us in reading his work and exploring the conflict between America’s promise and its racial history as well as its treatment of gay Americans.

We will meet every Monday from 6-8 between September 19 – October 24. We will not be meeting on October 10 in observance of Columbus Day. All reading materials will be available from the library.

Registration is limited and is on a first come/first serve basis. To register or for more information call (518) 828-1792 x101, email brenda.shufelt@hudsonarealibrary.org or stop by our front desk.

These sessions are done in partnership with Staley B. Keith Social Justice Center and SURJ-Hudson, and are facilitated by Donna Ford-Grover, Bard professor of American Literature. This program is free and open to the public and is made possible in part with public funds from the New York Council for the Humanities.

 

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