Abolition & Women’s Rights in Local History

Students from Hudson Community School’s Writing Center at the Harriet Tubman grave site in Auburn, NY.

The Hudson Area Library, as part of its Local History Speaker Series, is pleased to present “Abolition and Women’s Rights in Local History” by the students of Hudson Community Schools’ Writing Center at the Hudson High School on Thursday, June 8 @ 6pm.

Through a New York Humanities Action Grant given to the library with matching funds from Hudson Community Schools, high school students at the Writing Center, have been involved in studying primary source documents, photos and places about the abolition and suffrage movements in our local area and New York State. The Underground Railroad History Project of the Capital Region and the Hudson Area Library History Room have provided primary sources and books for the students on these exciting topics. Mary Liz Stewart of the Underground Railroad History Project along with Gail Wheeler, coordinator of the Writing Center, have helped the students contextualize these documents in terms of our nation’s history and the principles of historic investigation. The students also took a trip to Auburn and Seneca Falls, NY to visit various sites important in abolition and women’s rights.

At the June 8 event at the library students will present an exhibition featuring creative responses to their study and the meaning that history holds for the present day. Art pieces will include dance, poetry, and drawing. Mary Liz and Paul Stewart, founders of the Underground Railroad History Project will be on hand to answer questions along with the students.

This exhibition will remain in the library throughout the summer and will move to the Community Room in September for discussion with visiting school groups.

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At Ease: The Social Side of the Hudson Armory

An August 1947 advertisement for an evening of dancing & music at The Hudson Armory

The library’s History Room, as part of its Local History Speaker Series, and in honor of our year at The Armory, is pleased to present a talk on the social aspect of The Hudson Armory by Paul Barrett, on Thursday, April 27 at 6pm. Mr. Barrett, a researcher and local historian, is a sales agent for Hunt Real Estate and owner of The Country Squire B&B here in Hudson.

The State Armory in Hudson provided space for local militia to gather, train and store arms and ammunition. “Preparedness,” as it was called, was a serious function of the armory. The Hudson Armory was also used as a community center providing a place for social functions, public meetings, sporting events and fundraisers. Mr. Barrett will discuss how The Hudson Armory served as the backdrop for a wide variety of venues including beauty contests, big band performances, basketball tournaments, business expositions, exotic car shows and was even the center of a controversial brush with The Cold War.

This presentation is free and open to the public and will be in the library’s community room, which is wheelchair accessible. Seating is available on a first-come, first-served basis. A question and answer period will follow, accompanied by light refreshments.

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Local History Talk on Suffrage Celebrates Women’s History Month

Youngest Parader in NYC Suffragist Parade. Library of Congress: Prints and Photographs Division, Washington, DC.

Our library’s History Room, as part of its Local History Speaker Series, is pleased to present “Suffragettes: 100 Years, 10 Stories, from Hudson; We’re Counting” by Nicole Childrose on Thursday, March 23 at 6:00 pm.

This event will be an interactive lecture and discussion celebrating northeastern women and their contributions throughout history. An exploration of 10 case studies of local women with ties to Hudson and the greater Hudson Valley region will allow audience members to have a greater understanding of local women who have made political, economic and social contributions.
Continue reading

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Hudson Area Library and Drop Forge & Tool Present “Living Library”

The “Living Library” will be Saturday, March 4, from 3 – 5pm at the library. During this free public event participants can meet with experts in various fields. Learn how to conserve old family photographs and documents, research local family history, make herbal tea and discover its benefits, sew a button onto pretty much anything, find and download useful apps for your phone or device, properly care for and display the American flag, and more!

The library is a place to find information through books, lectures, and online sources. For two hours on this Saturday in March you can learn practical information and skills directly from members of our Hudson community. Experts on hand will include Jonathan Simons, real estate photographer, web page designer, photo retoucher and restorer; Lauren Giambrone, community herbalist, medicine maker and educator; Jeff Rigby, a library, museum and archive conservationist and bookbinder; Tod Wohlfarth, graphic designer; Lisa Durfee, vintage clothier, photographer and mudlark; John Craig, local history researcher; Perfect Ten teens, crafters of cool things; and Dan Shaughnessy, member of Elks Lodge #787.

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The Blue & the Gray: Early Potteries in and Around Hudson by Jon Meredith

2 gallon stoneware jug, marked C.W. HINSDALE & CO., DRUGGISTS, HUDSON, N.Y. with blue bird. Made for Charles Hinsdale, who operated a drug store at 305 Warren Street in Hudson, NY. Attributed to Hudson NY Pottery / Hudson Pottery Co., Hudson, NY, ca. 1867-69. (Collection of Jon and April Meredith)

The library’s History Room, as part of its Local History Speaker Series, will be presenting The Blue & the Gray: Early Potteries in and Around Hudson by Jon Meredith on Thursday, February 16 at 6pm.

Jon Meredith will be speaking on the stoneware industry that flourished in Hudson in the 1800s. Mr. Meredith has researched and collected Columbia County, NY stoneware over the last thirty six years, including pieces produced at the potteries in Hudson, NY, as well as pieces made for various merchants throughout the county. Continue reading

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The Hudson Residence of Charles Alger

Engraving of the Charles C. Alger residence in Hudson, NY, 1858.

Engraving of the Charles C. Alger residence in Hudson, NY, 1858.

The History Room Committee of the Hudson Area Library as part of its Local History Speaker Series, is pleased to present The Hudson Residence of Charles C. Alger and His Patronage of Architect Alexander Jackson Davis, by Walter G. Ritchie, Jr.
This presentation is free and will be held on Thursday, December 1 at 6:00pm. in the Community Room.

In 1848, Charles Coffey Alger (1809-1874), a Massachusetts iron manufacturer, organized in conjunction with a number of Hudson’s leading businessmen the Hudson Iron Company. Designed by Alger, the new iron works went into operation in 1851, the same year that he built at the corner of Allen and Second Streets in Hudson a picturesque Gothic Revival brick house embellished with bargeboards, finials, and eared drip moldings. The residence, described by a local newspaper in 1867 as “a correct specimen of gothic architecture,” was a well-known landmark for many years, situated on a large property that extended down a slope to Cross Street. This lecture will discuss Alger’s house at 59 Allen Street and also address his patronage of the noted 19th-century New York architect Alexander Jackson Davis (1803-1892), who designed or remodeled at least three other residences for Alger.

This presentation will be held in the Community Room on the first floor of the Hudson Area Library, with wheelchair access. Admission is free and open to the public. Seating is available on a first-come, first-served basis.

The History Room Committee’s Local History Speaker Series offers free monthly talks on diverse topics related to the history of Hudson, Greenport, Stockport, and Columbia County. The Hudson Area Library’s History Room houses a special collection that pertains to the history of the City of Hudson, as well as Columbia County and New York State. The History Room is open to the public on Saturdays from 10am-12pm, and by appointment.

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CGCC Students Present on Gotsch Papers

profgotsch

Join us on Thursday, November 10 from 6:00-8:00pm in the library’s Community Room for a presentation on the Gotsch Papers, a student-research project, co-sponsored by Columbia-Greene Community College and the Hudson Area Library as part of the college’s 50th anniversary.

Inspired by a local history project undertaken in the 1970s by former C-GCC academic dean Charles Gotsch, the current project, led by Nicole Childrose, assistant professor of history at C-GCC, follows up on Gotsch’s research, focusing on the social and cultural history of Hudson and the surrounding area in the 1800s. With support from Hudson Area Library History Room volunteers, college honor students have been delving into the library archives and other sources. During the presentation, students will discuss their research and provide an analysis of the social and cultural history of the area in the early 19th century. A question and answer session will conclude the presentation. All are welcome.

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Local History Speaker Series: Dr. Thomas Mounkhall on the Hudson River in a World History Context

We are pleased to welcome back Dr. Thomas Mounkhall to the library on Thursday, September 8 at 6pm and Sunday, September 11 at 4pm for a two part multimedia presentation as part of the library’s Local History Speaker Series. Both presentations will highlight the Hudson River during two significant time periods.

Dr. Thomas Mounkhall delivered the inaugural presentation in the Local History Speakers Series.

Dr. Thomas Mounkhall delivered the inaugural presentation in the Local History Speakers Series.

The first program (September 8) will cover the Hudson Valley from 20,000 BCE through 1500 CE, including migration, macro-change, flora diffusion, contingency and polycentrism. Mounkhall will then discuss Western European voyages of exploration through the influence of the Erie Canal on New York City from 1500 to 1830 in his second presentation (September 11).

A question and answer session will follow each presentation, accompanied by light refreshments. Attendees are welcome to come to one or both presentations. The presentations will be held in the library’s Community Room with seating available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Dr. Mounkhall has a doctorate in Modern World History from St. John’s University and over thirty years experience teaching World History in secondary schools. He is a former Adjunct Professor at SUNY New Paltz and has directed institutes in World History for high school teachers around the country. The Local History Speaker Series is a series of free monthly talks on diverse topics related to the history of Hudson, Greenport, Stockport, and Columbia County.

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