Local History Talk: The Mohicans’ Incorporation into the Iroquois League, 1671-1675

The Mohican Chief Etow Oh Koam, referred to as one of the Four Mohawk Kings, in a state visit to Queen Anne in 1710. By John Simon, c. 1750.

Program Description: Dr. Evan Haefeli, historian of colonial North America and the Atlantic world at Texas A&M University, will discuss the history of the Iroquois Confederacy’s relations with its Indigenous neighbors to the east and south, especially the people of the Hudson Valley.

Date/Time: Thursday, June 24, 6-7:30pm

Registration: For Zoom registration link click here or contact Brenda Shufelt at 518-828-1792 x106 or brenda.shufelt@hudsonarealibrary.org.

This event is offered in collaboration with The Jacob Leisler Institute for the Study of Early New York History.

The incorporation of the Mohicans into the Iroquois League has remained obscured but was pivotal to the history of the colonial northeast. It explains why the Mohicans and Munsee neighbors did not join in King Philip’s War and so prevented that conflict from spilling over into the Hudson Valley. It also clarifies the nature of Indigenous politics in the region in the era of Jacob Leisler.

The Jacob Leisler Library Lectures are made partially possible through the generous support of the Van Dyke Family Association.

Dr. Evan Haefeli has a particular interest in the political, religious, Indigenous, and imperial history of the colonial northeast. Born and raised on eastern Long Island, New York, he previously taught at Princeton University, where he received his PhD, as well as Tufts, Columbia University, and the London School of Economics. He has held a variety of fellowships, most recently from the NEH. His published books relating to colonial American and early New York history include New Netherland and the Dutch Origins of American Religious Liberty, Accidental Pluralism: America and the Religious Politics of English Expansion, and (with Kevin Sweeney), Captors and Captives: The 1704 French and Indian Raid on Deerfield.

The Jacob Leisler Institute for the Study of Early New York History is an independent, not-for-profit study and research center devoted to collecting, preserving, and disseminating information relating to colonial New York under English rule. In the years spanning 1664 to 1773, New York province’s diverse European settlements and Native American and African populations fused into a cosmopolitan colonial territory with ties throughout the Atlantic World. The Institute is unique in focusing on this under examined 109-year period in American history.

The Institute contains a collection of original, digital, and/or paper copies of primary source manuscripts, books, maps, and illustrative materials, as well as a library of secondary resources that provide scholarly context to the primary sources. The Jacob Leisler Institute is an open resource for both scholars and the interested public.