All Program News

Only the ten most recent Program posts are shown here. Go to All Programs Archive for complete listings.

Posted: February 19, 2019
Adults, News, Programs, Services

Beth Gordon at her Job Search area in the library with a Literacy Connections volunteer.

Program Description: Whether you are writing a resume for the first time or just need a professional eye to fine tune an existing one, the library has ongoing free one-on-one Job Search Help weekly and by appointment.

Date/Time: Every Friday 10am – 1pm & by appointment.

Registration: To make an appointment call 518-828-1792 x101, email programs@hudsonarealibrary.org, or stop by the main desk of the library

In this program there are two facilitators available to work with individuals on the various aspects of looking for employment. They have training to help with, not only resumes, but interview skills, online job applications, and finding the right market for your particular job skills. Both have access to job search resources online and in our area and have taken people through the process of searching for a job.

Beth Gordon is a Certified Career Services Provider, trained as a career coach through NCDA, the National Career Development Association. Beth provides professional development and advocacy to a diverse group of people who are out of work, looking to re-enter or join the workforce. She inspires and empowers individuals to achieve their career and life goals by consulting on resume writing, job search guidance, interview preparation and work ready assistance. She is available every Friday 10am – 1pm and by appointment.

Heather Martin, Area Coordinator of Literacy Connections, has worked with many people to frame life experience into marketable job skills, including stay-at-home moms. She can also help people to put their education and job experience from other countries into a resume for their current situation. Heather is available by appointment.

Having a qualified person work with an individual through the process of seeking a job can mean success. For example, since last year, Beth has helped eight people find a new career path, go on multiple interviews and get the job of their dreams.  One client started her career journey in October and by February, she landed an amazing job as a marketing executive at a digital company. Another out of work client, through advice from Beth, took a carpentry training course, and with his new resume in hand, found a job at a local contracting firm.

Job hunters should have basic computer skills and bring a copy of their resume if they have one. The Job Search Help Consultations are made possible, in part, with support from Mid-Hudson Library System.

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Posted: February 19, 2019
Adults, News, Programs

Program Description: Join our Nonfiction Book Group, facilitated by Mark Orton, for a discussion on The Rebellious Life of Mrs. Rosa Parks by Jeanne Theoharis, which unveils the lifelong activism of Mrs. Parks. As Neil Irvin Painter writes in the New York Times: “Parks was not an apolitical, middle-aged lady whose fatigue kept her seated. Both shy and militant, she was a committed activist enmeshed in racial politics — and their class and gender complications — wherever she lived.”

Date/Time: Monday, February 25, 6-7:30pm

The book is available to borrow in standard print, large print, ebook, and audio formats from the library. Email morton@hudsonarealibrary.org for more information or to register.

The Hudson Area Library Nonfiction Book Group reads nonfiction books with a focus on history, social and political life in the Western Hemisphere.

 

 

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Posted: February 19, 2019
Adults, News, Programs

Program Description: This month’s general reading book group selection is Code Girls: The Untold Story of the American Women Code Breakers of World War II by Liza Mundy. In the New York Times review of the book, Meryl Gordon writes: “In Liza Mundy’s prodigiously researched and engrossing new book…she describes the experiences of several thousand American women who spent the war years in Washington, untangling the clandestine messages sent by the Japanese and German militaries and diplomatic corps.”

Date/Time: Wednesday, February 27, 5-6pm

The book is available to check out from the mid-Hudson Library System in multiple formats.

This group covers fiction and nonfiction and meets once a month. To register for this book group email programs@hudsonarealibrary.org.

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Posted: February 19, 2019
Adults, Children, News, Programs, Young Adults

Ashley Bryan by Robert Shetterly, courtesy KaneLewis Productions

Program Description: In culmination of our month-long celebration of children’s book author and illustrator Ashley Bryan, join us for a screening of “I Know A Man…Ashley Bryan.” Directed by Richard Kane and Robert Shetterly, this documentary explores how Bryan has been using art his entire life to celebrate joy, mediate the darkness of war and racism, explore the mysteries of faith and create loving community. This screening is co-hosted with the library’s Tween Advisory Council. Families and youth of all ages are welcome. Special presentation, before the screening, of work created in our craft hours throughout the month. Fresh popcorn during movie &home-cooked food from Kayah Payton of the newly formed Grandma’s Kitchen!. 

Date/Time: Thursday, February 28, 5:30pm-7:30pm

Suggested Audience: families and youth of all ages.

Born in the Bronx in 1923, Ashley Bryan entered the tuition-free Cooper Union School of Art and Engineering, after being denied entry elsewhere because of his race. Drafted into the segregated US Army during World War II, Ashley preserved his humanity by drawing, stowing pastel crayons in his gas mask. After the war, he completed his Cooper Union degree, studied philosophy and literature at Columbia University on the GI Bill, and went to Europe on a Fulbright scholarship, seeking to understand why humans choose war.

Ashley returned to the United States, teaching art at several schools and universities, and retired to Maine’s Cranberry Isles as professor emeritus of Dartmouth College. Ashley Bryan has published over fifty books, including children’s books on African American spirituals and oral tradition. Among Ashley’s awards are the Coretta Scott King–Virginia Hamilton Lifetime Achievement Award, Laura Ingalls Wilder Medal, and the New York Public Library’s Literary Lions award. Ashley has stated: “If you put art into the world, you get beauty in return.”

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Posted: February 19, 2019
Children, News, Programs

Beautiful Blackbird illustration by Ashley Bryan courtesy of The Ashley Bryan Center

Program Description: In celebration of Black History Month we are proud to present a month long tribute of famed children’s book author and illustrator Ashley Bryan. The library’s regularly scheduled Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday Story & Craft Hours will be showcasing the different works and artistry of Ashley Bryan and his impact in the field of children literacy and education.

Date/Time: Wednesday & Thursday Story & Craft Hour, 10am-11am. Saturday Story and Craft Hour, 11am-12pm

Born in the Bronx in 1923, Ashley Bryan entered the tuition-free Cooper Union School of Art and Engineering, after being denied entry elsewhere because of his race. Drafted into the segregated US Army during World War II, Ashley preserved his humanity by drawing, stowing pastel crayons in his gas mask. After the war, he completed his Cooper Union degree, studied philosophy and literature at Columbia University on the GI Bill, and went to Europe on a Fulbright scholarship, seeking to understand why humans choose war. Ashley returned to the United States, teaching art at several schools and universities, and retired to Maine’s Cranberry Isles as professor emeritus of Dartmouth College. Ashley Bryan has published over fifty books, including children’s books on African American spirituals and oral tradition. Among Ashley’s awards are the Coretta Scott King–Virginia Hamilton Lifetime Achievement Award, Laura Ingalls Wilder Medal, and the New York Public Library’s Literary Lions award. Ashley has stated: “If you put art into the world, you get beauty in return.”

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Posted: February 17, 2019
Adults, News, Programs, Young Adults

Maria Manhattan with poster of her 1980s art installation “The Box Lunch”

Program Description: Feminism in Art: The Box Lunch & Beyond, an illustrated talk by Maria Manhattan in collaboration with Perfect Ten Hudson. Manhattan discusses her 1980s art exhibition, The Box Lunch, her response to Judy Chicago’s groundbreaking feminist work, The Dinner Party. Perfect Ten girls bring The Box Lunch into the 21st century with their own box lunches, created in workshops with Manhattan. 

There will be a few pieces from the original exhibit on display in the library as well as collages or assemblages created by the young women of Perfect Ten Hudson that honor women of their choosing. The Box Lunch and Beyond will be on display through April 30.

Date/Time: Thursday, March 28, 6-7:30pm

In 1979, when The Dinner Party debuted in San Francisco, Maria thought Chicago’s ideas needed to be expanded upon and so she created a parody. The press release at the time stated: “If you’re still hungry after THE DINNER PARTY, try Maria Manhattan’s THE BOX LUNCH, a major art event honoring 39 women of dubious distinction….” The exhibition consisted of assemblages in pink bakery boxes – tributes to women from pop culture including Lucy Ricardo, Betty Crocker, Lot’s Wife, Auntie Mame, and the First Avon Lady. Her point was that we’re all in it together, lest we forget.

A discussion will follow about how women have been seen in art and have utilized art on behalf of feminism, and how art throughout history has been determined by the male gaze.

This event is free and open to all. There will be refreshments following a question and answer period after the talk.

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Posted: February 17, 2019
Adults, News, Programs, Young Adults

Program Description:  We are pleased to announce Music in the Stacks, which features five one-hour Sunday afternoon concerts performed in the library throughout 2019 and hosted by Hudson area youth. These concerts, in the main area of the library, reflect a wide range of musical styles, genres, instruments and cultures. Audience members will receive cultural passports, which will be stamped at each concert. Attendance at all five makes them eligible to win a gift certificate to a Hudson music venue.

The first concert begins with Patrick Higgins, an experimental music composer and is hosted by Operation Unite NY youth. Higgins has been described by The New Yorker magazine as one of the “prime movers of the local avant-garde”, and an “exacting avant-classical guitarist by Time Out NY.

Date/Time: Sunday, March 24, 4-5:30pm

Audience: Tweens, teens, and adults

The Hudson Area Library will collaborate with Hudson area youth organizations to host these concerts. For each concert, youth leaders will introduce the musicians, facilitate a conversation about their music, and help with community outreach for the concerts. The concerts will include an introduction and conversation with the musicians about their music, instruments, or cultural tradition. A reception will follow the concerts with a chance for audience members to share their reactions and to interact with the musicians, youth emcees and each other.

Patrick Higgins, performer of the first concert, has composed works for the country’s leading ensembles, including orchestra works, percussion cycles, and string quartets. He has scored music for television, museum exhibition and feature-length and short films. Higgins plans and composes in ZS, which the New York Times called “one of the strongest avant-garde bands in New York.” His music has been performed in over 20 countries and at some of the world’s leading music festivals.

Emily Chameides, Hudson Area Library Director, states, “This first concert in our 2019 Music in the Stacks series represents the excellence, uniqueness and accessibility of music that we wish to bring to our patrons in the Hudson area. We invite all to this cultural, educational and social concert.”

Get your passports at the Patrick Higgins concert and save the dates for the four other 2019 Music in the Stacks concerts at the library! A Bangla band headlined by Palbasha Siddique will perform traditional and modern Bangladeshi music April 28 in conjunction with the Bangladeshi New Year. This concert is curated by the Bangladeshi American Society of Hudson and hosted by Hudson Muslim Youth. On May 19 there will be a Harmony Project Hudson student and instructor concert with violin, cello, recorder and accordion. The music will be a selection of pop, rock and jazz and will be hosted by members of the Hudson Area Library’s Tween Advisory Council. September 8 features a Bassoon Ensemble performing Celtic, jazz and blues pieces arranged for the bassoon. It will be hosted by student members of the Hudson City School District’s Tri-M Music Honor Society. September 29 Moor Mother, a Philadelphia-based noise artist, activist and wordsmith named Camae Ayewa, is hosted by teens from Kite’s Nest Space 2.0. The Moor Mother concert, in a collaboration with Basilica Hudson, is being curated and promoted by Basilica and they are waiving their curatorial and publicity fees.

This project is made possible with funds from the Decentralization Program, a regrant program of the New York, State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew M. Cuomo and the New York State Legislature and administered by the Greene County Council on the Arts.

 

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Posted: February 7, 2019
Adults, History Room, News, Programs

Courtesy of the Norman B. Leventhal Map & Education Center at the Boston Public Library

Program Description: Lou Roper, Professor of History at SUNY-New Paltz, speaks on seventeenth-century colonial New York and the Hudson River Valley in the context of the larger Atlantic World. This local history talk is a collaboration of the library, Jacob Leisler Institute for the Study of Early New York History, Gotham Center for New York City History, and Greenport Historical Society.

Date/Time: Thursday, March 21, 6-7:30pm

On the subject of this talk, Professor Roper stated: “Where does the history of New York fit into the history of colonial America and where does the history of colonial America fit into the history of the wider world? I will discuss the seventeenth-century European colonization of the greater Hudson Valley and what its history suggests about the character of early Americans.” Dr. David Voorhees, director of the Leisler Institute added, “We Americans…aren’t aware that what happened here is part of larger global movements.”

Lou Roper is Professor of History at the Department of History, State University of New York at New Paltz and is Co-General Editor of The Journal of Early American History. His latest books are Advancing Empire: English Interests and Overseas Expansion, 1613-1688 and his collection of essays, The Torrid Zone: Caribbean Colonization and Cultural Interaction in the Long Seventeenth Century. His studies at this time focus on the seventeenth-century slave trades and colonization of the area bounded by the Connecticut River and Chesapeake Bay.

A question and answer period and refreshments will follow the talk. For more information email programs@hudsonarealibrary.org, call 518-828-1792 x101, or visit the main desk in the library.

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Posted: February 5, 2019
Children, News, Programs

AmeriCorps Mary Shivers & Christa Shook work on a craft with a young library patron.

Wednesday 10-11am Story & Craft Hour Americorps workers Mary Shivers & Christa Shook read picture books and lead children in theme-related crafts. Recent craft activities include making superhero capes, designing children’s book bags, and creating turkeys from pine cones and pipe cleaners.

Americorps is a voluntary civil society program supported by the U.S. federal government, foundations, corporations, and other donors engaging adults in public service work with a goal of “helping others and meeting critical needs in the community.”

Janice Scali oversees the work of two of our youngest patrons.

Thursday 10-11am, Saturday 11am-12pm, Story & Craft Hour Children’s librarian Janice Scali reads picture books and leads children and families in theme-related crafts. 

Story & Craft Hour: Second Saturdays w/ Robin Weber – Saturdays, January 12, February 9 & March 9, 11am-12pm Robin Weber, High Five! volunteer, collaborates with children’s librarian Janice Scali on special Story & Craft Hour every second Saturday of the month. Each session will have a seasonal theme with a story reading and craft activity.

All materials provided. For children 2 – 7 years old & their families.

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Posted: February 5, 2019
Children, News, Programs

Program Description: In the second Saturday Story & Craft Hour in March children will craft a yarn nammas (god’s eye) and will be read an Ashley Bryan book with our our wonderful High Five! team member, Robin Weber.

Date/Time: March 9, 11am-12pm

Audience: Children 2 – 7 years old & their families

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Only the ten most recent Program posts are shown here. Go to All Programs Archive for complete listings.


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