History Room Programs

Only the most recent five History Room Program announcements are shown here. Go to History Room Programs Archive for complete listings.


Posted: May 26, 2022
Adults, History Room, News, Programs

Albany-Hudson Electric Trail Exhibition and Talk at the Library (Thursday, May 26)

The Hudson Area Library, in partnership with Columbia Friends of the Electric Trail, presents an exhibit of the interpretative panels along the Electric Trail in Columbia and Rensselaer counties. The exhibition runs through June 30. On Thursday, May 26, 6-7:30pm Matt Kierstead, who provided the documentation and interpretive services for the Electric Trail panels, will discuss the history and conversion of this train line in his talk Trolleys, Trails and Tales: Interpreting the Empire State Trail’s Albany-Hudson Electric Trail. This program is also in person at the Community Room of the library. 

The May 26 illustrated talk presents the corporate, social, and technological history of the “Albany-Hudson Fast Line” electrified high-speed interurban railway in Columbia and Rensselaer counties. It also tells the story of Hudson River Valley Greenway’s conversion of the surviving trolley line right-of-way into the Empire State Trail’s “Albany-Hudson Electric Trail” segment. Finally, Matt discusses the process of developing the trailside interpretive signage that explains the history of the railway, the communities it passed through, and historical features visible from the trail to the trail’s users.  

Columbia Friends of the Electric Trail (CFET) is an all-volunteer nonprofit organization formed in 2018 to support the Albany-Hudson Electric Trail, part of the statewide 750 mile Empire State Trail. CFET has loaned Hudson Area Library the Electric Trail panels for this exhibition and will be displaying these panels at other libraries and public spaces as a means of exposing the public to the fascinating history and beauty of this portion of the Empire State Trail.

In addition to the interpretative panels, this exhibition also features images from Larry Gobrecht’s collection on the Electric Park in Kinderhook. The Electric Park was an attraction on Kinderhook Lake that was along the trolley line that ran from Albany to Hudson from 1901 to 1920. Mr. Gobrecht retired as historian in the Recreation and Historic preservation office of the New York State Office of Parks and currently serves on the board of the Friends of Taconic State Park. The Gobrecht family has generously donated the rights to the digital images of this unique collection for use by the library.

Matt Kierstead is owner/proprietor of Milestone Heritage Consulting, a Hudson Valley business providing documentation and interpretation services for historic engineering, industrial, and transportation resources for clients including government agencies, private developers, and the heritage tourism industry. His focus areas include the history and technology of bridges, mining and quarrying, metallurgy, mineral processing, power generation, canal and rail transportation, and public utilities. Mr. Kierstead has completed over three hundred projects throughout the northeastern United States including historical resource surveys, National Register of Historic Places determinations of eligibility and nominations, Historic American Buildings Survey/Engineering Record (HABS/HAER) and state-level documentations, Superfund site cleanup consultation, and public history interpretation projects.

Columbia Friends of the Electric Trail’s mission is to maintain the Albany-Hudson Electric Trail in Columbia County; promote the Albany-Hudson Electric Trail as a recreational and economic development resource, support historic and heritage education, and foster conservation values; and collaborate with other organizations to develop ancillary trails linking the Albany-Hudson Electric Trail to significant sites and other trails.


Posted: May 14, 2022
Adults, History Room, News, Programs

Library and Leisler Institute Talk on Indigenous Slavery in Colonial New York and New Jersey (Thursday, June 9)

Join us and the Jacob Leisler Institute for the Study of Early New York History for a talk by Linford Fisher titled The Persistence of Indigenous Enslavement in Dutch and English New York and New Jersey. Indigenous peoples played important roles in the histories of Dutch colonialism and the colonies that later became New York and New Jersey. This public talk delves into one aspect of these histories and interactions, namely, the enslavement (and, at times, transshipment) of local Indigenous populations. Drawing upon colonial records and newspaper ads, Fisher argues that enslaved Indigenous people were present in these places far longer than we might expect and in ways that suggest a more diverse enslaved and unfree labor force than we have previously imagined.

Date/Time: Thursday, June 9, 6-7:30pm

Location: Virtual via Zoom

Registration: For Zoom link, click here

The Jacob Leisler Library Lectures are made partially possible through the generous support of the Van Dyke Family Foundation and Hudson River Bank and Trust.

 


Linford D. Fisher is an Associate Professor of History at Brown University. He is the author of The Indian Great Awakening: Religion and the Shaping of Native Cultures in Early America (2012) and the co-author of Decoding Roger Williams: The Lost Essay of Rhode Island’s Founding Father (2014). Fisher is the Principal Investigator of a digital project titled Stolen Relations: Recovering Stories of Indigenous Enslavement in the Americas, which is a community-centered, collaborative project that seeks to broaden our understanding of Indigenous experiences of settler colonialism and its legacies through the lens of slavery and servitude. Fisher is the author of more than a dozen articles, book chapters, and essays on a diverse array of topics. He is currently finishing a book-length project, tentatively titled America Enslaved: Native Slavery in the English Caribbean and the United States, on Native American enslavement in English colonies in North America and the Caribbean and, later, in the United States, between Columbus and the American Civil War.


Posted: May 1, 2022
Adults, History Room, News, Programs

Author Talk on Slavery and Resistance in Dutch New York with Andrea Mosterman (Friday, May 20)

The Hudson Area Library History Room, in collaboration with the Jacob Leisler Institute for the Study of Early New York History, presents Spaces of Enslavement: A History of Slavery and Resistance in Dutch New York , an author talk by Andrea Mosterman. A Q & A will follow book discussion and reading by the author and there will be copies available for purchase and signing.

Date/Time: Friday, May 20, 6-7:30pm
Location: Hudson Area Library Community Room. Masks are required for attendance.
Registration: No registration is required. Seating is limited and available on a first-come basis

Spaces of Enslavement (Cornell University Press, October 2021) explores the history of slavery and resistance in Dutch New York. Through examination of homes, Dutch Reformed churches, and public spaces, the book shows how Dutch American enslavers increasingly used their dominance over these spaces to control the people they enslaved. It also explores how enslaved people resisted such control by escaping or modifying these spaces and expanding their mobility and activities within them. Close analysis of these spaces demonstrates that slavery in New York was not somehow more benign than slavery in the plantation South.


Andrea Mosterman is associate professor in Atlantic History and Joseph Tregle Professor in Early American History at the University of New Orleans. She researches slavery and the slave trade in the Dutch Atlantic world. Her book Spaces of Enslavement: A History of Slavery and Resistance in Dutch New York (Cornell University Press, October 2021) has won the 2020 Hendricks Award for best book-length manuscript relating to New Netherland and the Dutch colonial experience.

The Jacob Leisler Library Lectures are made partially possible through the generous support of the Van Dyke Family Foundation and Hudson River Bank & Trust. 

 


Posted: March 11, 2022
Adults, History Room, Programs, Young Adults

The Library and the Leisler Institute Talk on Slavery in New Netherlands (Thursday, April 28)

In collaboration with the Jacob Leisler Institute for the Study of Early New York History we present Reconsidering Slavery in 17th century New Netherland – What do We Know? What Can We Learn?, a talk by Dennis J. Maika

Date/Time: Thursday, April 28, 6-7:30pm
Location: Virtual via Zoom
Registration: To register for the Zoom link click here.

There has been a glaring gap in today’s important and critical discussion of American slavery and its legacy: an accurate understanding of the lives of enslaved people and their enslavers in the Northern colonies and how their experiences contributed to the institution of American slavery. Many Americans are surprised to learn of the existence of Northern slavery and New Yorkers may be stunned to learn that slavery was deeply entwined in their colonial and state history. The purpose of this talk is to provide a broader historical context in which to consider some of these new revelations and the questions they raise. Hopefully, a better appreciation of slavery in New Netherland will stimulate a more accurate and comprehensive understanding of American slavery.


Dennis J. Maika is Senior Historian at the New Netherland Institute. A historian of colonial New York with a Ph.D. in History from New York University, he has written numerous articles and papers and served as a consultant for a variety of local history and education projects. His recent article, “To ‘experiment with a parcel of negros’: Incentive, Collaboration, and Competition in New Amsterdam’s Slave Trade,” was a winner of NNI’s 2021 Clague and Carol Van Slyke Article Prize. He is currently working on a book about Manhattan merchants and their city government in the Dutch and English periods of seventeenth-century New York history. As a professional educator, he taught History and Psychology at the high school and college levels for several decades.

The Jacob Leisler Library Lectures are made partially possible through the generous support of the Van Dyke Family Foundation.

Photo caption: List of Purchasers of “a lot of male and female Negroes,” From a Slave Auction in Manhattan, 29 May 1664. Source: Volume X, part III, pg. 228 New York Dutch Colonial Manuscripts. 29 May 1664.


Posted: March 6, 2022
Adults, History Room, News, Programs

First Jewish Americans: Freedom and Culture in the New World

This captivating story—explored in the New-York Historical Society’s past exhibition The First Jewish Americans: Freedom and Culture in the New World—is now available as a virtual presentation. Images featured in this presentation include archival documents, maps, ritual objects, rare portraits, and the 16th-century diary—lost for 80 years—of a Mexican Jewish man persecuted for his faith. Virtual via Zoom.

Date/Time: Wednesday, March 23, 6 – 7:15pm

Registration: To register and receive the Zoom link, email programs@hudsonarealibrary.org

This program is presented by the New-York Historical Society and sponsored by the Columbia County Libraries Association.

Picture: Thomas Sully. Rebecca Gratz, 1831. Oil on panel. The Rosenbach Museum and Library.


Posted: March 6, 2022
Adults, History Room, News, Programs, Young Adults

The City of Hudson & Its River: Discussion of Excerpts from the Library’s Oral History Collections

During 1948 flood two men survey damage at the Shacks, a historic shad fishing village. Image from Hudson Area Library’s Ciancetta-Rowles Photo Collection.

Join us for a special History Room on Zoom focused on Hudson’s relation to its eponymous river. A selection of audio and video clips from our Hudson Area Library (HAL) and the Black Legacy Association of Columbia County (BLACC) Oral History Collections, both housed at the library and soon to be available online, will be played. A panel will discuss these excerpts, photos of the river from our collection, and their own stories of how the river has impacted the residents of Hudson. Joining History Room on Zoom host and board trustee Gary Sheffer are Leo Bower, Shantytown historian, and Peter Tenerowicz, past Commodore of the Hudson Power Boat Association. Discussion and questions and answers will be interspersed throughout the evening.

Date/Time: Thursday, March 24, 6:00pm

Location: To register for the Zoom link, click here.

In 2019, the library was awarded an Accelerating Promising Practices for Small Libraries grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services for a collaborative project with Oral History Summer School (OHSS) to create interplay between this collection, the BLACC oral history collection, and the 500+ life histories in the OHSS collection. This project is also supported by a grant from the Fund for Columbia County of the Berkshire Taconic Community Foundation. Discussion and questions and answers will be interspersed throughout the evening.

 


Posted: January 24, 2022
Adults, History Room, News, Programs

History of the Black Community in Hudson: A Discussion of the Black Legacy Association of Columbia County (BLACC) Collection

Join Library Director Emily Chameides, Senior Policy Advisor of Hudson Catskill Housing Coalition Quintin Cross, and founder/executive director of Black Entrepreneur Market, Tiffany Garriga, for an evening celebrating the launch of the website dedicated to the Black Legacy Association of Columbia County (BLACC) Collection. This collection of local oral histories, images, and documents from the 1980s collected under the auspices of Columbia Opportunities has been organized, digitized, archived, and made accessible by the Hudson Area Library through a Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) grant. The evening will include video and audio of the oral history interviews of black residents of Hudson and the county. Discussion of the history of the black community and images from the collection will also be a part of the evening.

Date/Time: Thursday, March 3, 6pm

Location: Virtual via Zoom. Anyone needing technical assistance can view the event from our Community Room; email history@hudsonarealibrary.org.

Registration: To register and receive the Zoom link click here.

Columbia Opportunities, Inc. donated the collection to the Hudson Area Library in 2018. In 2019, the library was awarded an Accelerating Promising Practices for Small Libraries grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services for a collaborative project with Oral History Summer School (OHSS) to create interplay between this collection, the library’s oral history collection, and the 500+ life histories in the OHSS collection.

This project is supported by a grant from the Fund for Columbia County of the Berkshire Taconic Community Foundation.


Posted: January 16, 2022
Adults, History Room, News, Programs

Jacob Leisler: Fanatic or Martyr: a Library & Leisler Institute Talk

Program Description: The library’s History Room in collaboration with the Jacob Leisler Institute for the Study of Early New York History presents Fanatic or Martyr: Jacob Leisler, a Window into an Age, a talk by Dr. David Voorhees. On May 16, 1691, Jacob Leisler, de facto governor of New York, was hung til half-dead then beheaded before the largest gathering in New York City up to that date. Leisler’s administration had created a bitter division in New York. This presentation looks at how the deep emotions Jacob Leisler aroused reveal much about the milieu in which he lived and continued to echo in historical evaluations. Moreover, Leisler’s immediate family and their households of servants and enslaved persons, their trade and marital connections, and their actions provide insights into the broader social, ideological, economic, artistic, and political events of colonial New York and its place in the larger world at a time of tremendous change.

Date/Time: Thursday, January 27 6-7:30pm.

Registration: To register and receive the Zoom meeting link click here or contact Brenda Shufelt, History Room Coordinator, at 518-828-1792 x106 or brenda.shufelt@hudsonarealibrary.org for more information.

The Jacob Leisler Library Lectures are made partially possible through the generous support of the Van Dyke Family Foundation.

Dr. Voorhees is director of the Jacob Leisler Papers Project, formerly located at New York University, as well as the Jacob Leisler Institute headquartered in Hudson. He’s also managing editor of de Halve Maen (The Half Moon), a quarterly scholarly journal published by The Holland Society of New York. An NYU research scientist, he is a former managing reference history editor at Charles Scribner’s Sons and has published numerous historical works and articles, and been a consultant on historical exhibits at the Museum of the City of New York and the Bard Graduate Center in Manhattan among others.

The Jacob Leisler Institute for the Study of Early New York History is an independent, not-for-profit study and research center devoted to collecting, preserving, and disseminating information relating to colonial New York under English rule. In the years spanning 1664 to 1773, New York province’s diverse European settlements and Native American and African populations fused into a cosmopolitan colonial territory with ties throughout the Atlantic World. The Institute is unique in focusing on this under examined 109-year period in American history.

The Institute contains a collection of original, digital, and/or paper copies of primary source manuscripts, books, maps, and illustrative materials, as well as a library of secondary resources that provide scholarly context to the primary sources. The Jacob Leisler Institute is an open resource for both scholars and the interested public. 


Posted: November 2, 2021
Adults, Friends, Fundraising, History Room, News, Programs

The Library’s History Room Shop at Basilica Hudson’s Farm & Flea

Our History Room Shop will be at Basilica Hudson’s Farm & Flea 2021. Stop by and purchase unique gifts representing Hudson’s history! To see items for sale visit the Online Shop. For more information on Farm & Flea click here.

All proceeds from History Room Shop sales benefit the History Room and its mission of preserving, archiving, and making available images and material of the history of Hudson.


Posted: November 1, 2021
Adults, Friends, Fundraising, History Room, News, Programs

Give the Gift of Hudson’s History & Our Library at Winter Walk

Before Hudson’s Winter Walk festivities begin on Saturday, December 4, the library will have a special one-day sale 3-5pm, Give the Gift of Hudson’s History, at the library. After purchasing unique items for your holiday shopping at the library head out to Warren Street, 5-8pm, as Winter Walk returns to its street festival format to celebrate 25 years as Hudson’s favorite winter celebration. And make sure you visit the Hudson Area Library’s homage to Hudson’s fascinating history at 441 Warren Street, which includes Bob Rasner’s vintage trains set in an historic setting of Warren Street buildings.

The sale at the library includes archival quality copies of historic maps, aeroviews, and posters of Hudson from 1871 – 1923; sets of night-scene and Warren Street postcards; a set of note cards of prominent buildings from an 1871 map of Hudson; and tote bags and tea towels with a line drawing of the historic Armory by local artist and musician Tony Kieraldo. To view these items, visit the new History Room website, historyroom.hudsonarealibrary.org, and click on “Shop”. In addition to items in the online shop, there will be unique gifts including one of a kind framed photographs and antique books on the history of Hudson.

All proceeds benefit the Hudson Area Library’s History Room. Consider giving the Gift of Hudson’s History this holiday season! Your friends and family will receive unique items and you will be funding the work of preserving and making accessible to the public the history of the Hudson area.

441 Warren Street, our Winter Walk 2021 home, happens to be the former home of Rowles Studio, which preserved negatives from various photographic studios in the building from the 1860s into the 1980s that capture Hudson throughout these years. The window at 441 Warren Street will feature images from Rowles as well as historic postcard and map collections. 

 

“The library is pleased to participate in Winter Walk for the fourth year. We are proud and happy to share some of our History Room resources with Warren Street visitors this holiday season”, stated Emily Chameides, library director, “We congratulate Hudson Hall on its 25th Anniversary of this marvelous community event!”


Only the most recent ten Adult Programs are shown here. Go to Adult Programs Archive for complete listings